J-K: Pakistan violates ceasefire in Rajouri, fires mortar shells

In continuous incidents of unprovoked ceasefire violation across the Jammu and Kashmir line of control, Pakistani troops resorted Wednesday in the mortar bombing at various places along the border in the Nowshera sector in the district of Rajouri.

An army spokesman said “Pakistani troops fired light weapons, automatic weapons and mortars at 10:35 am along the LoC in the Nowshera area.” “The Indian army responded strongly and effectively,” he added.

Meanwhile, sources said that while in the LOC Kalsian, Bhawani Baba Khori and was active with Pakistani troops firing indiscriminately mortar grenades, controllers and light weapons on the Indian side.

People hid in their homes because it was difficult to leave the area to safer places at this time.

Significantly, the last-minute incident of the cease-fire violation occurred three days after four civilians, including one woman, were injured in Bandi Chechian Qasba and Poonch areas in the mortar shelling on the other side of the border.

The freshness of the bombings and unprovoked layoffs began the day after Pakistani troops in a meeting, mark with their Indian counterpart to Chakkan Da Bagh in Poonch last week had agreed to keep the peace and quiet at the border.

Following continuous incidents of unprovoked mortar shelling, in addition to automatic and light weapons on the Pakistan side, crossing the Line of Control travel and trade on the Poonch-Rawalakot road is suspended for the two months.

More than 115 Pakistani residents occupied Kashmir who traveled this side along the Poonch-Rawalakot road and were blocked for almost a month due to the suspension of the bus service to return home by road Uri-Muzaffarabad.

This could only be possible after Indian officials have addressed the issue with their counterpart PoK to facilitate the return of cross-passengers of the LoC blocked on both sides. Three Indian passengers stranded on PoK had also returned by Kaman Post on the Uri-Muzaffrabad road.

Since May 1 of this year, nine people, including four soldiers, were killed and 12 wounded in the mortar bombing did not shout and indiscriminate small arms were burned at regular intervals on the Indian side of the Control Line of troops in the districts of Rajouri and Poonch.

Last week, a young commissioner and a woman were killed in Pakistani bombing in the areas of Krishna Ghati and Mendhar, respectively.

The frequent skirmishes along the LoC, attributed to the growing desperation on the Pakistan side to push a maximum number of terrorists into the state this summer, have already made more than 3,000 people, including women and children, migrate from their homes near the border for safer places.

Of these, more than 1,000 are housed in camps established by the district administration, while others have gone to the homes of their relatives.

Gorakhpur child deaths spur 15-year-old schoolgirl to fundraise for oxygen

A 15-year-old student in Gorakhpur has set up a charity to provide oxygen to impoverished patients after 63 people, nearly half of whom died due to lack of oxygen at the main hospital in the hometown government .

Patients died of encephalitis, a disease that causes brain inflammation, after Gorakhpur Hospital ran out of oxygen due to unpaid bills, sparking outrage at the poorly run Indian state health system.

“This tragedy was something that could have been avoided,” said teenager Khushi Chandra, who set up Oxygen Gorakhpur to raise funds for oxygen in hospitals.

“It’s very personal to me, like it happened at my door … No child can be denied the right to life and, in this case, the right to breathe,” he said. said in a statement.

“As a responsible citizen of my city and my country, I feel responsible for the fact that such tragedies do not happen again,” he added.

Acute encephalitis syndrome and Japanese encephalitis epidemics are common in India, especially during the monsoon season, and require hundreds of lives.

Often referred to as “brain fever,” encephalitis causes high fever, vomiting and, in severe cases, convulsions, paralysis and coma. Infants and the elderly are particularly vulnerable.

Virus outbreaks tend to occur in poor areas, such as Gorakhpur, where mosses leave stagnant pools of water, allowing mosquitoes to reproduce and infect villagers.

Television media in mid-August – which showed that parents who had the bodies of the babies and said they had died because they had no oxygen – gave rise to widespread criticism of the state of Uttar Pradesh, where Gorakhpur is located.

The state, which is governed by the Bharatiya Janata party of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, triggered the head of the hospital as well as the head of the pediatric department.

But the dismissed hospital chief said he had written to the administration several times to free up funds to pay oxygen providers.

Public spending on public health accounts for about one percent of GDP, one of the lowest in the world. In recent years, the Modi government has increased health spending and is committed to making health care more affordable.

But Chandra said the Indians should help underserved hospitals provide bases like oxygen to prevent unnecessary deaths.

“I want the support of other like-minded citizens who come together to ensure that oxygen never stops in our hospitals,” he said.